Productive Pastor 20: 5 Keys to Effective Sermon Preparation

ProdPastor1

Welcome to sermon preparation month!

In August I am focusing both episodes on sermon preparation. This is the topic I have been hearing about the most and I am want to share some great content with you.

The List:

For a More Ordered Life, Organize like a chef. Dan Charnas
In the world of cooking, the mise-en-place is a near sacred technique of chefs and line cooks of preparation. In this NPR article and sound bite, Dan shares how we can each incorporate these ideas into our own organization.

5 Reasons to take an Extended Preaching Break: Bobby Williams
Bobby shares his journey of over-preaching and the benefit of taking extended breaks from preaching at his church.

Using Evernote in Message Preparation: Bobby Wiliiams
Besides a Moleskine notebook, evernote is the tool I have heard more preachers refer to using. I use Evernote like crazy. Bobby shares how he sets up and uses Evernote to aid in his message preparation. This is a great beginners guide to using Evernote for preaching.

5 Keys to Effective Sermon Preparation

I remember when I first started preaching. There was no rhyme or reason to how I prepared. I just started typing with an empty document and hoped for the best. Later, I took a few notes from my bible and started at least working with a basic idea in mind.

Over the last several years I have put a pretty good rhythm into place. These are 5 essentials practices that I believe will help anyone’s sermon preparation.

1. Read.
That’s it. You have to be reading. Read many different types of writing; articles, magazines, the newpaper and online. Read books related or unrelated to ministry. You will be surprised how much material you begin building up in your head.

2. Have a Holding Tank.
Find a way to capture this information. I use Evernote and a Field Notes notebook. Between the two, I always have something with me. I organize evernote with three folders to keep me moving forward and specific notebooks and folders for sermons I am researching/writing and preparing.

Here is a great read from over a 100 years ago about the benefit of keeping a preaching notebook.
The Growing of a Sermon.

3. Have a Preaching Calendar.
This is the best way to stay ahead and make sure you are preaching the whole counsel of God. It also is a huge help to the folks who assist in worship.

Productive Pastor 17: Why You Need a Production Calendar

4. Ask Others
Asking other people what they need to hear from church and letting them in on the preparation and visioning part of sermon work will not only be a help to you, but teach others about the holy act of preaching and preparation.

The Social Church Webinar

5. Find/Build and Stick to a preparation rhythm.
This is one of the hardest, but most rewarding practices. Learning to get this built into your weekly schedule will transform your sermon preparation. It will keep you on task and getting done early in the week (no one likes to write a sermon on Saturday).

photo(61)

Resources:
My Sermon Planning Worksheet
My Favorite Resources for Modern Preaching

On the next episode we will have John Chandler, of Sermonsmith, as our guest. He has interviewed dozens of preachers about their preparation process. It will be great.

Remember to sign up for the Productive Pastor Insider List. Get a great FREE productivity resource and the inside scoop every other Friday.

Listen:
Stitcher
RSS
Direct Download
iTunes

 

My Sermon Planning Worksheet

sermon planning worksheet

I was privileged to be part of the sermonsmith podcast a few weeks ago. In my interview I mentioned my sermon planning worksheet. I have been getting questions about this sheet, so I decided to tell a little more about it.

To get the free worksheet-just click this image. 

Sermon

Why I use a sermon planning worksheet

I really prefer having a physical document to orient my sermon preparation. I have found beginning a sermon on this sheet and letting it be for a couple of weeks is a great jump start to my weekly preparation. I have used variations of this sheet for years. In seminary, it was really focused on structural relationships and verb forms. A later version had big space for word study. Over the last couple of years it has evolved towards communication. Once I have a good understanding of the most important thing I can communicate, the sheet helps me trim down and not rabbit trail.

I do leave space for some extra things. I file these sheets away and I am hoping one day they will be a resource to someone.

The major thrust of my current version of the sheet reflects a set of questions at the core of Preaching rocket.

1. What is my message about?
2. What is at stake?
3. What do I want you (them) to do?
4. What is my bottomline?

After working weekly with those four questions and examining both my preparation and content/delivery of my sermons I realized a weakness I need to work on. It was actually glaring (to me. I needed to learn to better preach towards response. You would figure me growing up baptist this wouldn’t be hard. My preaching naturally defaults towards teaching so I need to start spending some time working on response. So the worksheet was modified again!

These are now the sections on my sheet. You can download a copy at the bottom of the post and see how I structure them.

1. What is my text/title?
2. What is my message about?
3. What is my big idea?
4. Important words/phrases5. Relationships/Structures
6. Backstory
7. How does this change my life?
8. What do I need to do?

You can see the evolution of my preaching in this current sheet. The heavy exegetical stuff is still there, but the newer additions to the sheet keep it focused. Asking the last two questions reminds me of what the most important part of proclamation is. God’s word never leaves us the same.

Should you use my sheet? Well, you can if you want…but I think you could easily come up with something better. What I encourage you to do is begin a process of discovering what helps you plan sermons best. I would love for you to share yours with me.

Related Posts:
My Favorite Resources for Modern Preaching
The Easiest Way to Preach Better Sermons
Teaching a Retreat? Here’s How I Plan

 

Other Resources:
Communicating For A Change: Andy Stanley (Great book for those looking at 1 point preaching)
Narrative Reading, Narrative Preaching: Reuniting New Testament Interpretation and Proclamation: Joel B Green and Michael Pasquarello For anyone who doesn’t believe preaching cannot be a marriage between the intellect and the heart needs to read this book. Dr. Pasquarello was my adviser and reader when I wrote my master’s thesis on preaching Revelation. This needs to be part of every preachers library.
Jonathan Andersen’s Exegetical Worksheet. This comes from the episode 2 of the productive pastor (link is in the shownotes). Jonathan does a great job putting together a sheet to guide exegesis.

My Favorite Resources for Modern Preaching

modern preaching

I remember the first church I was regularly in the preaching rotation. After a few sermons my pastor gave me a copy of the “Preacher’s Sourcebook of Creative Illustrations“. If you have ever wondered where country preachers get really corny stories…it is in books like these.

I think the method of preaching and preparing for sermons has changed drastically in the last 20 years. When I moved to St. Paul’s I had to shift from longer (30min) sermons to shorter messages. The content also had to shift. I was moving from a much more academic culture into one that had different needs. What I learned was the power of story telling and narrative preaching. I wanted to find great examples of people telling great stories. I want to share some of those findings with you. These are all great place any preacher could pick up a few new tips from.

My Favorite Resources for Modern Preaching

1.Pixar:
No one is better at telling a story people of all ages can focus in on than Pixar. I didn’t find out about this naturally. The wife and I don’t have kids. Our movie and television watching begins with the Walking Dead and ends with Quintin Tarantino (a GREAT storyteller) usually. I was aware of Pixar, but it was an article by Joe Berkowitz made me pay attention. Pixar’s 22 Rules of Storytelling–Visualized gives so many creative hints preachers can learn from. A google search will turn up more analysis of Pixar around the internet.

2. Fasttocreate.com
Fasttocreate.com is the creative arm of Fast Company. Full of intriguing content, much can be learned by spending 5 minutes a day on their site. The writing staff shares, picks apart and focuses on amazing story telling. This is the best place to be If you want to learn how peoples minds are listening, processing and ingesting information.

3. Nancy Duarte and Duarte
Nancy Duarte and her team at Duarte are hands down the best people developing digital presentations today. Most people learned about them after they worked on Al Gore’s “An Inconvenient Truth.” Nancy has written several great books on presentation development. Possibly the best, the one preachers really need to read, is being given away right now digitally. Resonate is a book we should all have in our toolbox. If you struggle with visual images in your sermons you really need slide:ology: The Art and Science of Creating Great Presentations. I think both of these books should be seminary and bible college curriculum for the craft of preaching.

Honorable Mention:

These are a few other great resources for modern preaching.

Ted Talks: I didn’t put Ted on the main list because I honestly think they are getting tired. The information is there, but the presentations have started to become lacking. There are still great ones…but I have personally found a hit or miss pattern lately.

SERMONSMITH: If you like digging into other peoples sermon preparation you need to listen to the SERMONSMITH podcast. I love it and don’t miss an episode.

Preaching Rocket: I have written before about why I love preaching rocket. It is an investment, but I couldn’t imagine not having their product in my toolbox. They have a great (free) webinar on How to Become a Better Storyteller.

Preachers, where do you find help in non traditional ways?

If you aren’t a preacher, what methods of sermon delivery do you appreciate?

Sermon Preview: Coming to Hope

HOME-FOR-CHRISTMAS_SIDE-1

When I was a child I loved traveling during the Christmas season. It meant experiencing the holiday even more special to do it with people I only saw a few times a year. I have plenty of stories I could share about those few days with family during the Christmas season (and on Sunday you will hear a great one!!!).

We associate Christmas with simpler times. We even make the journey home, to those places and relationships that signify simpler times. We go home to Grandma’s, see family, and talk about the last year. We relax in the company of those we love and care about.

Part of the spiritual season is celebrating the coming of Christ to our world. Since we celebrate a God who comes to our world both fully human and fully divine, God himself came home for Christmas. Another dimension to our reflection and worship during the Christmas season is at the center of Christian belief–that Jesus Christ is coming again and we are looking forward to it. Christ is coming home, to relationships and an environment with people he loves.

Coming Home for Christmas is our conversation theme this Advent at New Song. We are going to do some silly things, some serious things and some things for others. But the big thing is us thinking about what does it mean for Jesus to come home, here on our earth for Christmas.

Our Scripture for this first Sunday is a prophecy from Isaiah.

Isaiah 40:3-5,9-11

Listen! It’s the voice of someone shouting,
“Clear the way through the wilderness
for the Lord!
Make a straight highway through the wasteland
for our God!
Fill in the valleys,
and level the mountains and hills.
Straighten the curves,
and smooth out the rough places.
Then the glory of the Lord will be revealed,
and all people will see it together.
The Lord has spoken!”

O Zion, messenger of good news,
shout from the mountaintops!
Shout it louder, O Jerusalem.
Shout, and do not be afraid.
Tell the towns of Judah,
“Your God is coming!”
Yes, the Sovereign Lord is coming in power.
He will rule with a powerful arm.
See, he brings his reward with him as he comes.
He will feed his flock like a shepherd.
He will carry the lambs in his arms,
holding them close to his heart.
He will gently lead the mother sheep with their young.

God wants to come a clear a path through all of the mess of our life straight to him. He wants us to be making this path as well.

photo(28)Clear hearts create clear roads.

Scripture tells us of a God who is making a straight path for His people to follow. His people are also called to begin clearing that path themselves. The best way for us to encounter God is to begin preparing ourselves for when he comes.

It is easy to blindly celebrate Jesus during this season. I imagine Christmas is probably the easiest time of the year to be outwardly Christian. We have baby Jesus in mangers, wisemen, angels…the whole nine yards. But how often to we take a moment to actually pray and think over why each of us desperately need Jesus to come into our world. How often do we let God tell us the areas in our life where Jesus needs to come and live.

When we truly know exactly where we need Jesus to come, both for all of humanity and how he has in the past as well as how we need him to right now for us as well as for the full salvation and redemption of this world, we will understand what it means to hope. We will understand what we need to be doing to clear this path.

So we start off this advent thinking about the coming of Christ. The coming of God into our world. About that time in the past and the time in the future when God Himself will be coming home for Christmas.

See you in worship this Sunday!

Chad Brooks - Mar 9, 2014

Practicing Prayer

More From "Celebration of Discipline"

Powered by Series Engine

*What is a sermon preview?
Sermon previews are released on Friday’s. They are to give YOU a short glimpse of what the conversation is going to be like on Sunday morning. On Monday, the preview is updated with some discussion questions, scripture guide and an mp3 of the sermon. I do these for 2 reasons. The first is so God can continue working in your life throughout the week. The second is for you to share this with a friend. I invite and encourage you to share the preview on Facebook/Twitter and through email.

Teaching a retreat? Here’s how I plan.

This past weekend I was blessed to circle back with a seminary buddy Scott and his great youth group. It was a whirlwind trip. In 2 days I gave SIX messages. For those of you who don’t preach, that is TONS. More than I give in a month.
For people not in a spiritual teaching/preaching role regularly, this might just seem like what a preacher normally does with less time in between. It isn’t. The retreat environment is a game changer. It requires a different type of preparation as well as delivery. If you approach a retreat setting just like a regular Sunday you miss out on the richness of the entire experience.

Prepping for these type events can be stressful or it can be really cool. Let me clue you in on a few tips and ideas. Many of these will also work for planning an entire season of preaching…although since folks are hearing them several days apart you won’t get the level of familiarity.

1. Be in Prayer!!!
This should be a given. Since I agree to come and teach I have been praying for these kids and the words God wants me to share. This is the first step in any sermon, lesson or teaching preparation. I just wanted to make it clear.

2. Be in Good Communication with someone in charge.
Scott had a great theme for his year, “The Never Ending Story” and he asked me to play off that and introduce it. He is focusing an entire year on the large story of scripture. Since this idea is pretty familiar to me it was easy to get started. I also asked him questions about the students, their environment and overall context. You never want to be stepping into a situation with an audience you know nothing about.

3. Know what you can speak on.
Since Scott gave me a topic I was really familiar with (I kinda have a thing about canonical theology) I didn’t have to really stretch myself out. There are things I won’t talk on…I don’t have anything against them, it’s just something I have never thought about or fleshed out with a familiar audience, so I wouldn’t feel right sharing with strangers.

It might be helpful for you to have a written list of what you know you can do easily. I do. This will help you discern what you know you can and can’t do. Preparing for these messages will probably take a couple of months and it should be done mainly on outside time. Knowing what you are good at can never hurt.

4. Plan on finishing.
You need to speak on something you can finish. Talk about the whole thing. All of the idea or concept. All of the book of the Bible. You don’t want to leave things hanging and in this format. A multi message teaching event lets you can go a deeper than a Sunday morning. There is no reason to not focus on preaching through something completely. You don’t want to leave anyone hanging.

For this retreat I was getting to go from Genesis to Revelation. I was able to start well, spend time in the middle and end with a strong focus on Revelation.

5. Write a Big Idea
Write out a super easy sentence or phrase you can continually repeat during the messages. This will also help you keep on track and give folks a centering concept. It can also keep you on track when you are preparing. You don’t want to divert from this idea to much.

6. Map out your continuity.
Most likely you are going to be talking to these people for several hours in a concentrated amount of time. It might mean 3 days or it might mean 1 day. I spent time getting my talks about 60% prepared before I mapped them out. I made sure each one had 3 points.

1. Title
2. Scripture
3. Bottom Line (I am a big fan of the Rocket Company and their idea of a bottom line).

I went to my whiteboard and sequenced out my messages using these three points. I had my notes in front of me and went through each talk compared to the others. I ended up changing a couple of titles and focus scriptures to better fit the whole.

retreatimage

7. Name Drop.
Make sure you reference the previous material in your talks and even hint ahead. This helps folks realize you are telling one big story, instead of three or four random ones.

These are a few things that always help me when I am planning for retreat teachings. What helps you prepare for these type events?

The Easiest Way to Preach Better Sermons

The Easiest Way to Preach Better Sermons

 

During my seminary education I was able to learn the theology of preaching from great professors. I studied under wonderful scholars who could keep a congregation at attention when they preached. I worked with several excellent pastors and learned the craft preaching from them as well. I appreciate their example and education. I wanted to do better for myself and for the places God had placed me in. I wanted to preach better sermons.

2 years ago I moved back into the local church and begun preaching weekly for the first time. While I had always been a good “single shot” preacher, stepping in for a specific sermon or weekend, I had to learn what it meant to routinely preach to the same group of people.

In my search to get better I discovered The Rocket Company and one of their coaching products Preaching Rocket. I have been part of it for 3 months now and I love it.

If you want to learn, get better or begin preaching to modern crowds there is no better way than to invest in Preaching Rocket.

Here are 3 things I have benefited the most from:

1. Discerning 1 clear idea for my teachings:
Like many other folks growing up in church I was used to a 3 part sermon. The issue is the 3 part sermon gives to much information for people to process. As I was growing towards my understanding of the theology of preaching I begun to move away from an information based approach.

I think one of the major movements of the Church in the last 50 years or so has been giving people more information about God rather than talking about the character and works of God. The problem is our modern culture has shifted from a head based focus to a heart based focus. People want their emotions to be tugged and challenged. Information is just one tool you have in your toolbox.

Preaching Rocket and their idea of “the bottom line” promotes the idea of one very clear point. It is done with purpose and for clear communication. Everything is focused around supporting the bottom line.

2. Preaching towards response.
Jumping off from the first point, if we are presenting the message of Christ, we should always be calling people towards a distinct response. De-cluttering sermons helps best promote the intended response. What to do isn’t up in the air anymore. When you understand your response from the beginning you have yet another focus as you are preparing your messages.

3. It revolutionized preparation and study.
I have always been pretty disciplined when it came to preparation. I had my list of things I would always do. The issue was how to bring them all together at the middle of the week. Part of Preaching Rocket coaching is a daily method to help you always be organizing your messages towards the bottom line and intended response.

What was once threatening is now pretty simple. It isn’t me trying to collect tons of information and cram it all into 20 minutes. Now my week looks like intentional work, specific gathering and crafting. I can have multiple messages in the cooker at the same time. I simply put my most beneficial practices into the rhythm Preaching Rocket teaches and have a much more organized and efficient writing and preparing process.

If you speak in any sort of manner, not just preaching, this coaching will be super beneficial for you.